Commodities

Kathryn Dovey on OECD National Contact Points

06 June 2016

Kathryn Dovey is the manager for National Contact Point (NCP) coordination at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris. NCPs are an OECD mechanism intended to further the effectiveness of OECD's Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises by undertaking promotional activities, handling enquiries, and contributing to the resolution of issues that arise from the alleged non-observance of the Guidelines in specific instances. Civil society groups and trade unions have often resorted to the OECD mechanism to file complaints against companies which they argue have not observed the Guidelines. 

Dovey was earlier tax policy analyst at OECD, and before that, director at the Global Business Initiative on Human Rights. She has also been a research fellow on gender issues at IHRB. 

In a conversation with IHRB's Salil Tripathi, the OECD’s Kathryn Dovey discussed the reach of OECD National Contact Points (NCP), the potential NCPs represent, and how they could provide a way to ensure that companies act responsibly and adhere to international human rights standards. 

Download Filetype: MP3 - Size: 9.8MB - Duration: 8:38 m (160 kbps 44100 Hz)

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