Commodities

Dr V Suresh on India, Land and Accountability

20 January 2015

By Salil Tripathi, Senior Advisor, Global Issues, IHRB

Dr V Suresh is a human rights lawyer who is the national general secretary of the People's Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL), one of India's major human rights organisations. Dr Suresh has advanced legal principles drawn from comparative law to advance human rights work at the Madras High Court. He has advocated transparency and integrity from governments and businesses and has been appointed by the Supreme Court of India as Advisor for Food Security.

In Chennai, IHRB's Salil Tripathi spoke to Dr Suresh about human rights challenges for communities following the new ordinance passed by the Indian government which makes it easier for companies to acquire land.

Suresh also discusses the human rights implications of a recent Indian government decision to prevent a Greenpeace activist from boarding a flight abroad where she was to argue against Mahan, a major coal project in India. On Jan 20, the Delhi High Court asked the Indian Government to release the funds Greenpeace has received but which the government had blocked since last year.

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