ILO, ITUC, IOE & OHCHR Issue Joint Statement on Mega-Sporting Events and Human Rights

17 November 2015

The International Labour Organization (ILO), the International Organisation of Employers (IOE), the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) have issued a joint statement in advance of a two-day meeting on Human Rights and Mega-Sporting Events organized by IHRB, the Government of Switzerland, and Wilton Park. 

The joint statement highlights the pressing need for a more comprehensive approach to managing social risks and adverse human rights impacts arising from mega-sporting events and affirms the commitment of the four organisations to advancing dialogue and joint action with all actors in this area.

The Statement notes in particular: 

We support the aim of the meeting organisers to discuss and build consensus on the need, among others, for an independent centre for learning on responsibility in sporting events and methods of accountability for their delivery. We are committed to engaging actively in these discussions within our respective mandates and look forward to further dialogue and joint action in this area involving all relevant actors

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