Information & Communication Technology

Usha Ramanathan on Big Data

10 December 2017

By Salil Tripathi, Senior Advisor, Global Issues, IHRB

Download Filetype: MP3 - Size: 11.72MB - Duration: 13:11 m (124 kbps 44100 Hz)

The challenges that big data poses are mammoth and the questions of governance that are raised are only now being understood, human rights scholar Usha Ramanathan tells IHRB’s Salil Tripathi in this podcast. It is difficult to think of a remedy when society is only beginning to grasp the extent of technology and its pervasive control over lives. Surveillance is not a problem that affects only a few; the Aadhaar project in India shows that it can affect the lives of everyone in the world’s second-most populous nation.

Usha Ramanathan lives in New Delhi, India, where she works on the jurisprudence of law, poverty, and human rights. She has written extensively and spoken on a wide range of issues, including the nature of law, constitutional rights, mass displacement, eminent domain, civil liberty, corporate accountability, surveillance, beggary, criminal law, custodial institutions, and the judicial process.


This podcast is part of a mini-series dedicated to the theme of “Realising Access to Effective Remedy”, as part of IHRB's annual Top 10 Business & Human Rights issues for 2018.

Latest IHRB Publications

Increasing Access to Business Practice is Key to Scaling Respect for Human Rights

Finding effective ways to talk about human rights with colleagues is a common challenge confronted by practitioners working in companies to drive implementation of respect for human rights. 

Whether these discussions happen within one’s immediate...

Do It Just: Has Nike Started a New Trend?

“Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” 

These words, embossed over a close-up photograph of Colin Kaepernick, have already created debate over what many consider a controversial choice by sports company Nike to feature the...

Children’s Rights and Business – Stuck in the “Too Difficult” Box?

Businesses impact on the lives of children in a variety of direct and indirect ways.

Children are consumers of products and services, they are dependents of workers, and they might be young workers themselves or, at least, will be future workers...