Colin Jackson on Mega-Sporting Events and Human Rights

12 May 2015

By Salil Tripathi, Senior Advisor, Global Issues, IHRB

www.telegraph.co.uk

Human rights are inextricably linked with sports. The mottos and codes of conduct of most sports organisations reflect the spirit of human rights and athletes have often championed human rights. Athletes and sportsmen and women who later become ambassadors of their sports have often transcended their positions and advocated greater respect for human rights.

Mega-sporting events - such as the Olympics or the FIFA World Cup - bring together the nations of the world to participate in competitive sports. But they also bring together businesses who build the infrastructure, manufacture merchandise, and offer services to ensure that the events run smoothly. IHRB has been at the forefront of highlighting business responsibilities towards human rights in mega-sporting events.

Colin Jackson is a champion athlete who has been an Olympic silver medalist for Britain, and has been the world champion in 110m hurdles thrice, and held the world record for the race for over a decade. He has also been the European champion for 12 years running and won the Commonwealth Games gold medal twice.

Jackson is a firm believer in the power of sports to bring people, businesses, and athletes together to promote human rights. In a conversation in Lausanne, the home of the International Olympic Committee, he spoke to IHRB's Salil Tripathi about the potential of sports to help improve human rights standards and the responsibilities of sportspeople and businesses associated with sports to do their best towards that end.

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