Mega-Sporting Events

Sustainable Sourcing, Grievance Mechanisms, and Human Rights at Mega-Sporting Events - Tokyo 2020

29 March 2018

On September 13, 2017, IHRB on behalf of the Mega-Sporting Events Platform for Human Rights organised, with the support of the Swiss Government and together with Caux Round Table Japan, its first workshop in Japan, towards making respect for human rights a reality in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. 

The workshop was attended by 76 persons from 41 organisations, including the International Olympic Committee, the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the Olympics headquarters in the Cabinet Secretariat, and other related organisations of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, sponsor companies, NGOs from Japan and abroad, athletes’ organisations, the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Justice, and Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, as well as U.S. and Swiss Embassies in Japan.

The workshop aimed to identify, and share among the participants, key points and issues surrounding the implementation of sustainable sourcing policies and grievance mechanisms in relation to mega-sporting events.

This meeting report summarises the key points from each contributor, and is available in both English and Japanese.

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