Commodities

Arnold Kwesiga on Corporate Accountability in Uganda

13 September 2016

Download Filetype: MP3 - Size: 23.9MB - Duration: 12:55 m (259 kbps 44100 Hz)

Arnold Kwesiga is the Coordinator of the Uganda Consortium on Corporate Accountability (UCCA). Recently in Kampala, IHRB's Salil Tripathi of IHRB met Arnold to discuss the state of corporate accountability in Uganda. Arnold spoke of the need for Uganda to prepare a proper national action plan, and for ways to engage local companies to embrace the UN Guiding Principles. A bigger challenge is tackling Uganda's informal sector in which 85% of Ugandans work, and who remain beyond the reach of big companies, foreign or local. This week (September 14-15, 2016) the Consortium is organising a major conference on business and human rights in Kampala, whose live-stream can be watched below. 

Kwesiga holds an LLM in International Human Rights Law from the University of Notre Dame in the US and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Makerere University in Uganda. He has previously worked for Human Rights Watch, Centre for Policy Analysis (Parliament Watch) and the Refugee Law Project, School of Law, Makerere University. Arnold holds a great passion for general human rights discourse, with a bias in social justice issues and minority rights. Arnold is a member of both the Public Interest Law Clinic and the Network for Public Interest Lawyers at Makerere University School of Law.

Livestream the business and human rights consortium in Kampala: 

Day 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmhXAehK6iY&feature=youtu.be

Day 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0DlcNQTuE2A&feature=youtu.be

Latest IHRB Publications

Do It Just: Has Nike Started a New Trend?

“Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” 

These words, embossed over a close-up photograph of Colin Kaepernick, have already created debate over what many consider a controversial choice by sports company Nike to feature the...

Children’s Rights and Business – Stuck in the “Too Difficult” Box?

Businesses impact on the lives of children in a variety of direct and indirect ways.

Children are consumers of products and services, they are dependents of workers, and they might be young workers themselves or, at least, will be future workers...

2018 TIP Report: Despite Shortcomings, An Opportunity for Continued Advocacy in Southeast Asia

The United States Department of State released its 2018 Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report on 28th June, ranking 187 countries on their performance in preventing and addressing trafficking for labour and sexual exploitation.

The report was first...

18 July 2018

Commentary by Julia Batho, Research Fellow, IHRB