Commodities

Strategic Environmental and Social Assessment of the Oil & Gas Sector in Kenya

11 March 2016

Significant discoveries in Kenya’s emerging oil and gas sector have highlighted the importance of strengthening government capacity to manage the petroleum sector in ways that contribute to sustainable development. World Bank funding through the Kenya Petroleum Sector Technical Assistance Program(KEPTAP) has spearheaded these efforts. Part of the assistance includes conducting a Strategic Environmental and Social Assessment (SESA) to identify and improve management, socio-economic and environmental impacts of the oil and gas sector in Kenya.

As a contribution to this process, Cordaid Kenya, through its Making Extractives Work for the People Programme, and IHRB through its Nairobi Process initiative, held a one-day knowledge sharing session for the planned SESA. The session brought together CSOs and county government officials (Turkana County) in charge of environment and energy ministries. The knowledge sharing session sought to build understanding on the planned SESA while identifying opportunities and strategies for maximizing the participation of communities and CSOs at all process stages.  Read the summary below.

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