Mega-Sporting Events

Learning Experience? Japan’s TITP and the Challenge of Protecting the Rights of Migrant Workers

Report, 16 October 2017

By Takeshi Hayakawa, IHRB Visiting Researcher 2016, Jon Barnes, Independent Researcher; Research Fellow, IHRB

Migrant workers are an ever-present feature of global supply chains. They work in all sectors and all geographies. Low-skilled migrant workers are however amongst the most vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. Compounding this, they are also often among the least able to assert their rights. For many, a lack of viable options to sustain a livelihood at home increases their willingness to accept risks inherent to migrating for work abroad. 

Exploitative employment conditions for migrant workers can often be exacerbated by the construction demands of mega-sporting events. In the context of Japan, the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games shine a light on the employment conditions of migrant workers there, and in particular Japan’s Technical Intern Training Programme (TITP).

This report provides an overview of the TITP and how it operates in principle and practice. The main aim of this report is to promote international awareness of TITP and its impacts, much of which has not been accessible to date in English.

 

Image: Flickr/Samantha Marx

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