Migrant Workers

Corporate Liability for Forced Labour and Human Trafficking

24 October 2016

Flickr/Curt Carnemark/World Bank/1525609427

While direct corporate liability for instances of forced labour and trafficking in supply chains is limited, modern slavery is not just a supply chain issue. Companies are at risk of liability for any direct use of forced labour or involvement in human trafficking.

This IHRB report maps corporate liability for forced labour and human trafficking across several jurisdictions, highlighting legislation that applies to companies and what legal duties are expected in business operations and activities - including responsibilities to detect, prevent, mitigate, report and remedy incidences of trafficking and forced labour.

This report has been developed in collaboration with Hogan Lovells LLP with the support of Thomson Reuters Foundation's TrustLaw programme.

Read now.
 

Image: Flickr/Curt Carnemark/World Bank/1525609427

Latest IHRB Publications

The Governance Legacy of Mega-Sporting Events: A Golden Opportunity to Promote Human Rights

Human rights’ next of kin is the global anti-corruption movement. These two efforts increasingly work in tandem, creating the conditions in which humans flourish. Their synergy has at least two explanations. Most obviously, we know that corruption...

Channelling Sir Geoffrey Chandler on the History and Future of Business and Human Rights

I write from Tokyo this week where I am honouring a longstanding commitment to address business and human rights issues. But there is nowhere in the world I would rather be today - professionally or personally - than with you at the Bonavero...

06 December 2018

Commentary by Bennett Freeman

Rights and Wrongs: Best Or Loudest?

Last week, Jack Dorsey, the chief executive of Twitter, visited India. He met a few leading women activists and journalists who use the social media platform extensively, in order to understand better how they felt about the space his company...