Migrant Workers

Launch of the Translated Dhaka Principles in Tokyo, Japan

15 September 2017

Dhaka Principles in Japanese

IHRB has today published a Japanese translation of the Dhaka Principles for Migration with Dignity. The Dhaka Principles provide a roadmap that traces migrant workers from recruitment, through employment, to the end of contract, and provides key principles that employers and recruiters should respect at each stage in the process to ensure migration with dignity.

Since the Dhaka Principles were launched in 2011 they have been extensively used by business, governments and civil society organisations to understand and address the challenges facing migrant workers, and the responsibilities of those who recruit and employ them. This new Japanese translation means that the Dhaka Principles are now available in a total of 18 languages, helping to ensure migration with dignity across a range of sectors and geographic locations.

The Japanese translation has been prepared to coincide with the 2017 Tokyo Business and Human Rights Conference, co-hosted by Caux Round Table Japan, IHRB, and the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. IHRB's Chief Executive John Morrison provided the closing remarks of the conference, launching the translation to a gathering of nearly 100 Japanese businesses across a range of industries.  
For more information on IHRB's Migrant Workers Programme and implementing the Dhaka Principles, contact Neill Wilkins at [email protected].

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