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From Red to Green Flags - The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in high-risk countries

From Red to Green Flags - The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in high-risk countries
IHRB's report is designed to assist corporate managers as well as NGOs, governments and academics with an interest in business and human rights and related fields.

The Institute for Human Rights and Business is pleased to announce the launch of its latest report - From Red to Green Flags - The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in high-risk countries. Companies operating in weak governance zones or d

The Institute for Human Rights and Business is pleased to announce the launch of its latest report - From Red to Green Flags - The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in high-risk countries.

Companies operating in weak governance zones or dysfunctional states face multiple human rights risks, and their actions may pose risks to others. Building on the UN endorsed Protect, Respect, Remedy framework on business and human rights, this new report explores the specific human rights dilemmas and challenges facing companies operating in such contexts and provides detailed guidance for business leaders in meeting their human rights responsibilities.

It is designed to assist corporate managers as well as NGOs, governments and academics with an interest in business and human rights and related fields.

In IHRB's latest commentary, Nick Killick, the lead author of the Green Flags report, discusses the challenges ahead for companies in ensuring they respect human rights when operating in countries where governments are failing on a widespread basis to fulfill their own obligations.

From Red to Green Flags
- The corporate responsibility to respect human rights in high-risk countries

Praise for From Red to Green Flags:

"For those companies who see war zones and repressive regimes as niche markets, law enforcement and civil actions are probably the best option. But for the majority of businesses who find themselves working in or sourcing from places where violence and coercion are facts of life, this report will be a welcome source of guidance. No document can offer a simple and guaranteed way to eliminate all the risks of business-related human rights abuse, but this report from the Institute for Human Rights and Business will go a long way to helping companies act responsibly in the most difficult of circumstances."

Mark Taylor, Researcher, Fafo Institute, Norway and principal researcher of the Red Flags Initiative

"Over the years companies have begun to develop an understanding of what they must not do. Compliance with the law, and doing no harm, are the essential building blocks for companies operating in high risk zones. But once they are there, what can they do? In this report, the Institute for Human Rights and Business offers sound advice on this very real problem businesses face. It doesn’t offer easy answers, because there are no easy answers. It offers ways to approach the issue with caution, and provides the framework for companies to get it right."

- David Rice, Senior Associate, University of Cambridge Programme for Sustainability Leadership, and formerly Director, Policy Unit, and Chief of Staff, Government and Public Affairs, at BP plc.

Related Links

IHRB Commentary: From Red to Green Flags
- by Nick Killick, 02 May 2011

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